Monday

Site Introduction

Welcome to my Photo Gallery. With more than 1,478 posts and counting, many containing multiple pictures, I estimate that there are now more than 6,150 pictures on a wide variety of subjects scattered throughout the site that have received more than 318,898 page views. Because most of the pictures shown here have been captured while hiking areas in and around Las Vegas, the site has somewhat evolved into more of a hiking journal; listing and describing the places I have visited. There are five ways to find information on the site. [1] To locate a page on a specific place or subject, use the SEARCH THIS BLOG box located in the upper left side of the home page. For additional ways to locate specific pages ... {click "Read more >>" below}

Sunday

Recently Added Pages

Click here to see a list of site maintenance actions ... Notes on Recent Site Maintenance


January 2018 Posts (by Category & Title)
NEW - Kingman AZ - Kingman Arizona - Summary Page

December 2017 Posts (by Category & Title)
NEW - Birds - Long Crested Stellers Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri macrolopha)
NEW - Las Vegas Places of Interest - Ethel M Botanical Christmas Cactus Garden

NEW - Las Vegas Places of Interest - The Great Christmas Light Fight
NEW - North Shore Road - Cottonwood Springs
NEW - North Shore Road - Blue Point Spring
UPDATED - Valley of Fire - Elephant Rock - VOF
                  
Click the "Read more" link below to view a list of 2016-2017 Year-to-Date posts ... 
Click here to view an index of ALL HIKES Listed by Previous Year and Month ...                          Click here to view an index of ALL HIKES by location: Daytrips & Hike Index

Note: Every attempt is made to provide accurate information on the posts made on this site, but occasionally depictions may be inaccurate due to error of available information at the time of posting, mapping, navigation or cataloging. The information on this site is provided without any warranty, express or implied, and is indended for informational and historical purposes only.

If you have any comments regarding any of these postings, or if you would like to be placed on my mailing list, click here for contact information ... Contact Me.

Mr. D'z Route 66 Diner

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This page last updated on 01/14/2018
(Fig. 01)
Description: As noted previously, I have eaten here many times at Mr. D'z Route 66 Diner (Fig. 01) and have brought friends here on more than occasion. This diner is an old fashioned diner, serving traditional diner fare, and is best known for its homemade root beer and pizza.  The diner is loaded with Route 66 memorabilia as seen in Figures 02 thru 04.  Mr D'z, since 2000, has been operated by Armando & Michelle Jimenez, who have worked very hard to bring Mr D'z to where it is today....Armando has been a Chef for some 20 odd years, and has worked at restaurants on Catalina Island, Avalon, California, and most recently, before re-opening Mr D'z was the Suez Chef at the former Brown Derby at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas, Nevada. Inspired by the everyday family cooking that we grew up with, you’ll feel at home while savoring a great meal in their casual and relaxed dining room (Fig. 03). Mr. D'z was also profiled in the March 2013 issue of Arizona Highways magazine. Full breakfast is served open to close, great Burgers, plus lunch and dinner entrees. With attentive service and a friendly atmosphere, it makes it one of the most popular restaurants on Route 66. I would recommend this place to anyone looking for good comfort food, quality service and a fun throwback atmosphere, all for a reasonable price. So stop on in and enjoy the atmosphere and make this a place to remember.
                                         
(Fig. 02)
(Fig. 03)
(Fig. 04)
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Monday

Locomotive Park, Kingman, AZ

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This page last updated on 01/14/2018
(Fig. 01)


On a trip to Laughlin in January of 2009, we stopped by the Locomotive Park in Kingman, AZ, home to famed steam engine #3759. Built in 1928 by the Baldwin Locomotive Works of Eddystone, PA, Engine No. 3759, a “Northern-type” coal burning steam locomotive ran passengers between Los Angeles and Kansas City for more than 20 years, and before it was retired by the Santa Fe Railroad, it had run a total of 2,585,600 miles. This engine was a 4-8-4 "Northern" type steam engine. It was one of sixty-five engines of this type used by AT&SF. 4-8-4 refers to the wheel configuration of the engine. There is a four-wheel leading truck, supporting the cab of the engine. This four-wheel truck is followed by an eight wheel driver arrangement. The driver wheels on the steam engine were 73 inches in diameter. The driver wheels are followed by another four-wheel truck, the trailing truck, which supported the fireboxes and the boilers. The 4-8-4 configuration made locomotives faster, and was used mainly on fast freight and passenger trains. In 1941, Engine No. 3759 was rebuilt and converted to run on oil fuel. Engine No. 3759 was presented to the City of Kingman by the Santa Fe Railroad in 1957 as a historical monument. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Area Description: Kingman, the Heart of historic Route 66 & one of the hidden treasures of Arizona, is conveniently located on Interstate 40 and is the perfect launching point for "Route 66 and Beyond". Scenic hiking, historic charm, great cafes and restaurants, and the allure of Route 66 combine to make Kingman a remarkable destination. At an elevation of around 3,300 feet Kingman offers a temperate climate year-round. Kingman was founded as a railroad settlement and a monument in the park pays tribute to those who forged the route, such as the wagon trails of the early settlers and the surveys of Lt. Edward Beale. Located directly across from the Historic Route 66 Museum, Locomotive Park is a place where visitors may get up close and examine this marvel of earlier locomotive structure and design while listening to the modern trains whizzing by on the nearby railroad tracks across the street.

(Fig. 02)


History of Old Steam Locomotive 4960:  Locomotive 4960, last used on the Grand Canyon Railroad, is on display at the Grand Canyon Railroad depot in Williams, Arizona. The 4960, a 2-8-2 was first used in CB&Q excursion service on December 28, 1958 when the Illinois  Railroad Club sponsored a trip between Chicago and Ottawa. 4960 received a major overhaul in 1961 where she received new tires, flues, arch tubes, and arch brick. On March 4, 1966, after over seven years of excursion service, the CB&Q announced that steam trips would be discontinued after 4960's July 17 trip. However, 4960 was not scrapped. In 1966, 4960 was retired to the Circus World Museum where she remained until donated to the Mid-Continent Railway Historical Society's museum at North Freedom, Wis. In 1980, she was leased to an excursion operator, the Bristol & North Western (B&NW) Railroad, in Bristol, VA. A short-lived reprieve, she entered service running out of Bentham, Va., during the summer of 1981.

During this time, a personal relationship began between 4960 and two present Grand Canyon Railway employees: Ervin White, train master, and Robert Franzen, superintendent motive power. White was part of the crew that prepared 4960 for the trip and moved her from North Freedom to Bristol. He stayed on with the B&NW in charge of train operations and maintenance of track. At this same time, Franzen signed on with the company as a fireman. Both worked on the engine to prepare her for the 1981 season and continued to operate her throughout the summer as firemen and engineers. By 1984 the picnic was over. The B&NW went out of business and Franzen ran her for the last time from Benhams to Bristol. Both White and Franzen bid her farewell, not knowing they would eventually meet again.

In March 1985, the engine was moved to Ft. Wayne, Ind., where she declined in storage until purchased by the Grand Canyon Railway. Shortly after the reinaugural of the Grand Canyon Railway on September 17, 1989, mechanics dissembled most of the components and shipped the running gear on trucks and the frame, boiler, cab and tender on flat cars to Williams, AZ.

(Fig. 03)


Finally stopped in July 1993, she began one of the most thorough overhauls of a steam locomotive in modern times. Stripped of all running gear, tubes, electrical systems, bearings, pumps, stay bolts, and coal systems, she looked a bit forlorn. But, as newly manufactured and rebuilt equipment is added to the basic frame and boiler, the huge engine continued to take on a new life of her own. Boiler men, welders, electricians, and mechanics turned out flue sheets, pumps, fittings, and running gear to low tolerance specifications from raw material that made 4960 the queen of the United States steam fleet. No rebuilding in the past 45 years has been so complete. Franzen was in charge of this massive rebuilding project that spanned more that 24 months and expenditure of hundreds of thousands of dollars. Ervin White supervised train operations.

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Amtrak Station & Model Railroad Museum

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This page last updated on 01/14/2018
(Fig. 01)
Description: Kingman has passenger rail service at its train station. It is served by the Amtrak Southwest Chief route, with daily service between Los Angeles and Chicago. The small Amtrak station in downtown Kingman is a historically significant building, constructed in Mission Revival Style architecture; however, prior to the establishment of Amtrak in 1971, the structure had fallen into disrepair with the decline of passenger rail service in the U.S. A total renovation of the building was completed in 2010. While still serving as a railroad station, the building is also now home to a model railroad museum. Kingman also is located on the Southern Transcon route of the BNSF Railway. This is the main transcontinental route between Los Angeles and Chicago, and carries 100 to 150 freight trains per day.
 
History Recent research shows that Kingman has had four railroad depots, all of which were operational prior to Arizona being admitted as the 48th State to the United States.  The first train to come to Kingman arrived on March 28, 1883. The Atlantic and Pacific Railroad used a boxcar then as a depot at the southeast corner of 4th and Front Streets (Andy Devine Ave.) until a proper depot was built.  All subsequent depots were constructed in the same location. The Second was built in 1885 and destroyed by fire in 1900.  The fire was said to have been caused by hot cinders from a passing steam engine. The Santa Fe Railway then built a single-story wooden depot in 1900 that looked similar to the current one, except that it did not have the ornate roof structures.  This new depot opened its doors in December.  It burned down on June 24, 1906, and again the fire was said to have been caused by hot cinders from a passing steam engine. After having lost the two previous depots to fire, the Santa Fe Railway built a new depot that was fireproof and constructed of concrete with a stucco siding. This was a success, as the depot that opened on July 22nd, 1907,  is still standing today (Fig. 01). By the early 2000's the depot was in disrepair. It was restored, and the building was reopened in the spring of 2011.  Although the station is an unmanned station (meaning there are no ticket agents or baggage services), Amtrak uses the west end of the building as a crew room and passenger waiting room for the two Amtrak trains that stop there daily.  The larger portion of the building now houses the Kingman Railroad Museum and is used by the Whistle Stop Railroad Club twice monthly for their membership meetings.

The Museum: The Whistle Stop Railroad Club Railroad Museum is located inside the train depot on Andy Devine, Historic Route 66, at Fourth street. It is in the east end of the building. The hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. The 14,500 square foot museum space showcases various relics, different types of model trains, and the history of trains here in Kingman. There are several model train sets to watch run and include Lionel, N gauge and HO-gauge. With the cooperation of the City of Kingman, the Whistle Stop Railroad Club created, operates and maintains the Kingman Railroad Museum. The club is comprised solely of volunteers who have a shared interest in the preservation of the historical depot, finding and obtaining railroad memorabilia, and in sharing their findings with the public. They built three beautiful layouts that are on display at the museum -  one each in N Scale, O scale and HO scale.  At this time, the club is revamping the HO layout by adding DCC wiring and making the Plexiglas walls around it more camera friendly.

(Fig. 02)
(Fig.  03)
(Fig. 04)




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